Nigel Farage, Brexit architect and Member of European Parliament, unleashed a fiery rebuke of the EU's hypocritical targeting of Poland and Hungary under dubious pretenses, after they turned a blind eye to tyrannical behavior by the Spanish government in Catalonia.

During an address that was explosive even by Farage's standards, he praised leadership in Warsaw and Bupadest for working to secure their borders, root out communists, and challenge the George Soros agenda, aiming his criticism directly at Frans Timmermans, Vice President of the European Commission, who was seated nearby.

"You get Law and Justice in power [Poland's governing party], who are critical of the European Union - and just because they try to clear out the communist old guard and modernize their system, here you are on the verge of invoking Article 7 and taking away their democratic rights within the Union," Farage said. "And of course, it's the same story in Hungary, where Viktor Orbán quite rightly refuses to accept your ludicrous migrant quota program, and he is now cast as the devil.

"Perhaps the real reason is that he's taking on Soros - perhaps the most dangerous man in Western democracy today. 'Keep going Viktor Orbán!' is all that free democrats can say."

The Polish government has been advancing reforms to their legal system aimed at dismantling a “privileged caste” of left-wing activist lawyers and judges, obligating ‘Christian values’ to be considered in Supreme Court rulings, and shaking up the entire judiciary by dismissing many sitting judges while also re-structuring how they are appointed.

Law and Justice party founder, Jaroslaw Kaczynski, has asserted that Poland's post-Soviet court system remains a "stronghold of post-communists."

Hungary's leadership has been fighting their own battles with subversive actors, such as George Soros - a Hungarian-born kingpin behind the Orbán-coined 'Soros mafia,' and also against the unelected bureaucrats in Brussels, many of whom are fellow travelers in the post-communist era of technocratic internationalism.

For these reasons, in conjunction with staunch positions taken by both Warsaw and Budapest in their flat rejection of forced 'refugee resettlement quotas,' the EU is engaged in all-out political and legal warfare with both nations, including a propaganda campaign taken up by Western mainstream media attempting to portray their governments as authoritarian, regressive, and repressive.

The BBC recently ran a short series about Poland and Hungary titled, "Europe's Illiberal Democrats."

In the episode description for the Hungary segment, the BBC wrote, "The government has changed the constitution, electoral law, and refused to take its EU-allocated quota of refugees, while warning of a 'Muslim invasion.' The government spokesman insists that avoiding 'mass immigration' is Hungary’s right, and that it is merely helping to protect Europe’s Christian culture and heritage. The European parliament is so concerned about the perceived breaches of EU values that it has launched a procedure that could culminate in Hungary’s EU voting rights being withdrawn."

 

Drawing a stark contrast between the EU's meddling in the sovereign affairs of 'dissident' nations if an "infringement" of civil rights can be used as an excuse, Farage pointed out that EU officials hardly issued a word of rebuke when hundreds of Catalans were severely abused by Spanish police in the wake of the region's vote to secede last year.

"950 people get beaten up by the police because they want to turn out on a Sunday morning and express an opinion - a totally clear violation, Mr. Timmermans, of people's human rights; an absolute abuse of any sense of democratic process, and yet you say in that case, 'It's none of our business,'" Farage reprimanded. "But of course, they're a pro-EU government, so the iron fist of the European government is reserved purely for your critics."


Dan Lyman: